Back Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C Raises Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

People with chronic hepatitis C appear to have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease even though they are on average younger, have lower blood fat levels, and are less likely to have high blood pressure, according to a study of more than 171,000 patients receiving care at Veterans Affairs health facilities.

Early Bilirubin Elevation May Predict Severe Anemia during Interferon/ribavirin Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis C

Elevated total bilirubin levels during the first few days of treatment with interferon plus ribavirin can help predict which patients will develop severe hemolytic anemia as a side effect of ribavirin, according to research presented at the 2009 Digestive Disease Week meeting (DDW 2009) last month in Chicago.

DDW 2009: Vitamin B12 Levels May Help Predict Response to Interferon-based Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C

Serum levels of vitamin B12 may be among the factors that can help predict whether patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection will respond to interferon-based treatment, according to a study by researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm presented this week at the annual Digestive Disease Week (DDW 2009) meeting in Chicago.

Older Genotype 3 Chronic Hepatitis C Patients Do Not Respond as Well to Interferon-based Therapy

Older age is associated with a lower likelihood of sustained response to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in genotype 3 chronic hepatitis C patients, and people 50 years or older may benefit from longer treatment, according to a study presented at the recent Digestive Disease Week annual meeting (DDW 2009) in Chicago.

EASL 2009: Antiviral Agents with Activity against Both HIV and Hepatitis C Virus

Standard therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection consists of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, but several novel agents under study directly target various steps of the HCV lifecycle, an approach known as "STAT-C." Some of these investigational agents work similarly to certain antiretroviral drugs for HIV, suggesting it may be possible to develop drugs that have activity against both HIV-HCV, a potential benefit for HIV-HCV coinfected patients.

Predictors of Sustained Treatment Response in HIV-HCV Coinfected Patients Receiving Routine Care

As reported at the recent Digestive Disease Week annual meeting (DDW 2009) in Chicago, Lisa Backus and colleagues evaluated the predictors of sustained virological response (SVR) for HIV-HCV coinfected patients receiving pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in routine care at Veterans Affairs (VA) medical facilities.

Researchers Report Promising Results from Studies of 3 Therapeutic HCV Vaccines

Current standard therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection consists of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, and several directly targeted oral anti-HCV agents are in advanced stages of development. But another approach -- therapeutic vaccines -- is also under study, as reported in 3 presentations at the 44th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2009) last month in Copenhagen.

Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Increased Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients

As reported at the Digestive Disease Week (DDW 2009) annual meeting last week in Chicago, Bhavna Malik and colleagues sought to determine whether the presence of clinical risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) -- i.e., obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia (elevated triglycerides), and hypertension (high blood pressure) -- in people with hepatitis C increases the risk of progression to HCC.

Active Injection Drug Users and Those on Opiate Substitution Treatment Can Have Good Hepatitis C Therapy Outcomes

Active injection drug users (IDUs) and those receiving opiate substitution can be successfully treated for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to a French study presented at the 44th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2009) last month in Copenhagen.