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EASL 2015: Sofosbuvir/ Ledipasvir Cures More Than 90% of People with Hepatitis C Genotypes 4 and 5

An interferon-free regimen of sofosbuvir and ledipasvir (Harvoni) produced sustained virological response rates of 93% for people with HCV genotype 4 and 95% for those with genotype 5, according to a French study presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna.

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EASL 2015: People with Hepatitis C Have Higher Cancer Rates, Even When Excluding Liver Cancer

Hepatitis C patients in the Kaiser Permanente Southern California health maintenance organization had significantly increased cancer rates compared to members without HCV infection, and this remained the case even after accounting for liver cancer, which showed the greatest excess risk, researchers reported at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna.

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EASL 2015: Gilead Triple Combination Cures Easy-To-Treat Hepatitis C Patients in 6 Weeks

A 6-week regimen of sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus 2 experimental direct-acting antivirals being developed by Gilead Sciences cured more than 90% of previously untreated people with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus and no liver cirrhosis, according to a poster presentation at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna. A 4-week regimen was not effective for any group, however, and 6 weeks appears inadequate for harder-to-treat patients. Other studies showed that the new drugs -- GS-5816 (velpatasvir) and GS-9857 -- are also active against other HCV genotypes.

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Coverage of the 2015 EASL International Liver Congress

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 50th European Association for the Study of the Liver International Liver Congress (EASL 2015) in Vienna, April 22-26, 2015.

Conference highlights include interferon-free hepatitis C treatment for people with advanced disease, experimental HCV antivirals, hepatitis B and delta, and management of liver disease complications.

Full listing by topic

International Liver Congress website

5/5/15

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EASL 2015: Sofosbuvir-based Therapy Effective for Hepatitis C Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis

Interferon-free regimens containing sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus simeprevir (Olysio) cured about three-quarters of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C patients with advanced cirrhosis and MELD scores >10 in the real-world HCV-TARGET study, researchers reported at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna. The sustained response rate in HCV-TARGET fell to 39% for genotype 3, but another study found that 70% of genotype 3 patients with decompensated cirrhosis could be cured with sofosbuvir plus daclatasvir (Daklinza), while sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni) cured up to 86% of genotype 1 patients.

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EASL 2015: Paritaprevir and Ombitasvir Are Effective for Japanese Patients with HCV Genotype 1b

AbbVie's paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir coformulation (Viekirax in Europe; part of the Viekira Pak regimen in the U.S.) was highly effective in curing hepatitis C without the accompaniment of dasabuvir (Exviera) in Japanese people with genotype 1b hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the GIFT-1 trial, researchers reported at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last week in Vienna.

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EASL 2015: Civacir Immune Globulin May Help Prevent HCV Reinfection after Liver Transplant

Civacir, a hepatitis C immune globulin or antibody product, reduced the likelihood of hepatitis C virus infecting the new liver graft after transplantation in patients who were receiving but had not yet completed antiviral treatment, according to preliminary study findings presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna.

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EASL 2015: Heavy Alcohol Use Is Strongest Predictor of Liver Damage and Death in French Hepatitis C Patients

People with hepatitis C have a much greater risk of liver-related hospitalization or death if they have an alcohol use disorder or another serious comorbidity such as HIV infection, chronic kidney disease, or cancer, according to an analysis of everyone hospitalized in France between 2008 and 2012 presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last week in Vienna. In the absence of these problems, however, people with hepatitis C did not have an increased risk of death compared to the general population.

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