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Hepatitis C

AASLD 2014: Young Drug Injectors on Opioid Agonist Therapy Have Lower Risk of HCV Infection

Young people who inject drugs (PWID) who undergo opioid agonist maintenance therapy with methadone or buprenorphine have more than a 60% reduction in their risk of acquiring hepatitis C virus (HCV) over time, compared to those with no substance use treatment, according to a study presented Monday at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting in Boston. Findings were also published in the October 27 edition of JAMA Internal Medicine.

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AASLD 2014: HIV Positive People Have High Survival Rates After Liver Transplants Due to HCC

People with HIV -- most of whom were coinfected with hepatitis B or C -- generally had good outcomes after liver transplantation due to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), with 5-year survival rates similar to those of HIV negative transplant recipients and better than those of people who underwent other types of liver cancer treatment, researchers reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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Hepatitis C Vaccine Is Safe and Induces Immune Responses in Early Human Trial

A new hepatitis C vaccine demonstrated good safely and tolerability in a first-in-humans Phase 1 clinical trial, with only mild and transient side effects, according to a report in the November 5 edition of Science Translational Medicine. The vaccine, which mimics immune responses in people who naturally clear hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, led to increased production of T-cells targeting the virus. Phase 2 studies are now underway in Baltimore and San Francisco, with results expected in 2016.

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AASLD 2014: Sustained Response to HCV Treatment Reduces Mortality, Liver Cancer, Liver Transplants

People who achieve sustained virological response (SVR) when treated with interferon-based therapy for hepatitis C have a lower risk of death, are less likely to develop liver cancer, and need fewer liver transplants than those who were treated but not cured, according to results from a meta-analysis of more than 34,000 patients presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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AASLD Liver Meeting Starts this Weekend in Boston

The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) annual Liver Meeting gets underway this weekend, running through November 11 at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. Once again, this year's meeting will highlight interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens for hepatitis C.

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AASLD 2014: Sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir Cures Nearly All Genotype 1 HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

All but 1 participant treated with a coformulation of sofosbuvir and ledipasvir (Harvoni) achieved sustained virological response at 12 weeks post-treatment in a study looking at traditionally hard-to-treat HIV/HCV coinfected patients, researchers reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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Opioid Maintenance Therapy Linked to Lower Hepatitis C Rates for People Who Inject Drugs

Young drug injectors who undergo opioid agonist maintenance therapy using buprenorphine or methadone have a lower likelihood of becoming infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) than those who continue injecting or use other types of substance use treatment, according to a study published in the October 27 edition of JAMA Internal Medicine.

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FDA Approves Simeprevir + Sofosbuvir Combination for Hepatitis C

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this week announced additional approval of interferon-free oral therapy for chronic hepatitis C combining Janssen's HCV protease inhibitor simeprevir (Olysio) plus Gilead Sciences' HCV polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), both of which were approved separately in late 2013.

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IDWeek 2014: Age, Sex, and Race Predict Spontaneous Hepatitis C Virus Clearance

African-Americans, men, and older people were less likely to experience natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance without treatment, according to findings presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia. Overall, out of more than 1000 people with newly reported HCV infection, 15% spontaneously cleared the virus.

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