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Liver & Kidney Disease

CROI 2015: Tenofovir, Atazanavir & Lopinavir Associated with Raised Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease

Three antiretroviral drugs are associated with a slowly increasing rate of chronic kidney disease over time, researchers reported at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle. Although the risk of developing chronic kidney disease was low for people with normal kidney function -- with fewer than 1% of patients in the large D:A:D cohort developing it -- the use of any of these drugs was associated with 2 to 3 times higher risk of kidney disease developing over the course of 5 years on the drug.

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HIV Rebound Linked to Liver Fibrosis Progression in HIV/HCV Coinfected

HIV-positive people with hepatitis C virus (HCV) experienced progression to liver fibrosis if their HIV viral load rebounded above 1000 copies/mL or remained detectable on 2 consecutive tests, researchers reported in the January edition of HIV Medicine. Smaller transient HIV "blips," however, were not associated with worsening fibrosis. Optimized antiretroviral therapy, the study authors suggested, may protect the liver.

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CROI 2014: Tesamorelin Growth-Hormone Releaser Reduces Liver Fat in People with HIV

Tesamorelin, a synthetic form of growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), which the FDA has approved to reduce excess visceral abdominal fat in people living with HIV, also reduced associated liver fat in an HIV positive cohort chosen for abdominal adiposity, according to the results from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial presented at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this week in Boston.

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HIVMA Issues Guidelines for Managing Chronic Kidney Disease in People with HIV

The HIV Medical Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has released updated recommendations for HIV positive people with chronic kidney disease. The guidelines, published in the September 17 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, state that antiretroviral therapy (ART) is beneficial for such patients, but they should avoid tenofovir (Viread, also in the Truvada, Atripla, Complera, and Stribild coformulations), which can cause kidney impairment.

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IAS 2013: End-Stage Kidney Disease Is More Common Among People with HIV

HIV positive people in the U.S. and Canada are nearly 4 times as likely to develop end-stage renal disease than HIV negative people in the general population, largely driven by a very high rate among blacks, researchers reported last month at the 7th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013) in Kuala Lumpur.

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