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Children & Adolescents

CROI 2015: Week-on, Weekend-Off HIV Treatment Controls Viral Load in Young People

Taking an efavirenz-based antiretroviral regimen during the week and taking no medication on 2 days over the weekend was just as effective as daily treatment at controlling viral load in an 11-country trial of adolescents and young people, Karina Butler from Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital in Dublin reported at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) taking place this week in Seattle.

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CROI 2015: Weekends Off Treatment Works Well for Some Young People with HIV [VIDEO]

Taking breaks from antiretroviral therapy on the weekend did not lead to viral rebound or other problems for adolescents and young adults who had prolonged viral suppression on efavirenz-based regimens, according to a presentation at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) this week in Seattle.

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Adolescents Born with HIV May Have Higher Heart Disease Risk

Nearly half of adolescents with lifelong HIV infection were found to have evidence of coronary artery atherosclerosis, putting them at elevated risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the December 23, 2013, advance edition of Circulation.

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AIDS 2014: Worldwide Adolescent AIDS Deaths Rising, Especially Among Boys

While new HIV infections have declined among children, adolescents, and adults since 2000, HIV-related deaths have risen sharply among adolescents, especially 15- to 19-year-old males, Tyler Porth of UNICEF reported at the 20th International AIDS Conference last month in Melbourne.

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Updated Guidelines for Antiretroviral Treatment of Children with HIV

The Department of Health and Human Services this week updated its Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection. Changes to the children's guidelines include specific drug recommendations and information about a possible cure of an HIV-infected infant following very early treatment.

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