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HIV Disease Progression

HIV Superinfection May Boost Viral Load but Does Not Worsen Disease Progression

Superinfection with a second strain of HIV may lead to a more rapid increase in plasma HIV RNA levels, but apparently does not contribute much to CD4 T-cell loss or disease progression, according to a study published in the September 24 edition of AIDS.

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Coverage of the 2014 International AIDS Conference

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), July 20-25, in Melbourne, Australia.

Conference highlights include biomedical HIV prevention (PrEP and treatment-as-prevention), HIV cure research, interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C and HIV/HCV coinfection, access to treatment, and fighting stigma and criminalization of key affected populations.

Full listing by topic

AIDS 2014 website

7/25/14

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CROI 2014: Cumulative Viral Load and HIV Disease Progression

Periodic low-level viral load appears to predict virological failure, but not progression to AIDS or death, and cumulative viral load over time may be a risk factor for HIV disease progression and mortality, according to studies presented at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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Inherited Low Cholesterol in Immune Cells Linked to Slower HIV Disease Progression

A genetic variation linked to lower levels of intracellular cholesterol is associated with reduced transmission of HIV between immune cells, which may contribute to slower evolution of disease in non-progressors, according to a report in the April 29, 2014, edition of the electronic journal mBio, published by the American Society for Microbiology.

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Low CD4 Count Despite Viral Suppression Linked to Higher Risk of Death

HIV positive people who have poor CD4 T-cell recovery on antiretroviral therapy (ART) had higher mortality than those with good immunological response, even if they reached undetectable viral load, according to a study published in the January 22 advance edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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