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Women & HIV

AIDS 2014: More Data Suggest Increased HIV Risk from Injectable Contraceptives

A sophisticated meta-analysis, pooling individual-level data on 37,000 women, has found that the use of DMPA injectable hormonal contraception is linked with a higher rate of new HIV infections among women, researchers reported at the 20th International AIDS Conference last week in Melbourne. However, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced at the same session that its guideline supporting the provision of this contraceptive to women at risk of HIV infection remains unchanged.

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Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Is Effective for Women with HIV

HIV positive women respond well to the Gardasil human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, offering them protection against cervical cancer, according to a study published in the April 14 electronic edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. Related recent research found that both Gardasil and Cervarix are effective in people with HIV.

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HIV+ Women May Experience More Severe Menopause Symptoms

Women with HIV on average experience more severe hot flashes around the time of menopause than HIV negative women, and they interfere more with daily life, according to a study described in the July 1, 2013, advance online edition of the journal Menopause.

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New Recommendations for Earlier HIV Screening and PrEP for Women

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists last week issued 2 new recommendations on screening and prevention of HIV in women. The first matches the CDC's recommendation that HIV screening should start at age 13 and should be offered at least annually to at-risk women. The second advises that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) -- using antiretroviral medications such as Truvada to prevent HIV infection -- may be a useful tool for women at highest risk, including those with HIV positive male partners.

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GRACE Survey Sheds Light on Treatment Benefits and Barriers for HIV+ Women

Caring for children, unemployment, and transportation difficulties were among the factors most likely to lead to poor adherence, early dropout, and suboptimal response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among participants in the GRACE trial, which tested darunavir (Prezista) in a study population consisting largely of women of color. Overall, they said participation was a positive experience and they would encourage others to join a clinical trial.

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