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HIV Law & Criminalization

AIDS 2014: Criminalization Decreases HIV Prevention and Treatment Among Gay Men [VIDEO]

Gay and bisexual men who have been arrested or persecuted for same-sex activity are less likely to access HIV prevention services, and those who are HIV positive are less likely to receive antiretroviral treatment, according to a study presented at the 20th International AIDS Conference last month in Melbourne.

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Of Guidelines Targets, and Resources -- Documents that Defined AIDS 2014

If there was a phrase that defined the 20th International AIDS Conference last week in Melbourne -- one that surfaced in every few presentations and kept turning up in documents -- it was "key affected populations." New World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines released in conjunction with AIDS 2014 recommend pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) as an option for gay men at risk for HIV infection and naloxone to prevent overdoses among people who inject drugs (PWID).

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AIDS 2014 Mobilization: Activists Demand More HIV Funding, End Stigma [VIDEO]

Thousands of delegates, advocates, and people living with HIV came together July 22 for the AIDS 2014 Mobilization March and candlelight vigil, held in conjunction with the 20th International AIDS Conference taking place this week in Melbourne. Key themes included the need for more funding to expand access to HIV prevention and treatment, and ending discrimination and criminalization of people with HIV and at-risk groups including gay men, sex workers, and people who use drugs.

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AIDS 2014: Police Can Play a Role in Reducing HIV [VIDEO]

An increasing body of evidence indicates that police practices -- including confiscating condoms from sex workers, arresting people for using drugs, and persecuting gay men and transgender people -- can impede public health and discourage people from accessing crucial HIV prevention and care services.

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IAS 2013: Scientists and Clinicians Must Challenge HIV-related Stigma

Scientists should not only create knowledge to improve the HIV epidemic, they also have a duty to speak out about human rights abuses and ensure that access to effective, high quality HIV prevention, care, and treatment programs are unimpeded by laws, stigma, and discrimination, experts in human rights and law asserted at several sessions held during the alt7th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013) this month in Kuala Lumpur.

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