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AIDS 2016: Starting Treatment on the Day of HIV Diagnosis Improves Outcomes

Interventions to improve linkage to HIV care and retention in treatment which speed up the start of antiretroviral therapy (ART) or provide intensive support to people before starting treatment produce better retention than standard practices, researchers reported at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Early HIV Treatment -- Mothers Say They Need Time to Think

Findings from the first randomized controlled trial to date evaluating postpartum antiretroviral therapy (ART) for women with high CD4 cell counts (over 400 cells/mm3) highlight a critical need to increase treatment acceptance in this population, according to research presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Long-Acting Injectable Drugs Work Well for HIV Maintenance Therapy

A pair of long-acting injectable antiretrovirals -- cabotegravir and rilpivirine -- administered once every 4 or 8 weeks maintained viral suppression in people who switched regimens with undetectable viral load, according to 48-week results from the LATTE-2 trial presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) this week in Durban. A related qualitative analysis showed that study participants preferred long-acting injectables over pills for several reasons.

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AIDS 2016: Once-Daily Raltegravir Works as Well as Twice-Daily For Initial HIV Treatment

A new formulation of the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (Isentress) taken once daily suppressed HIV viral load as well as the older formulation taken twice a day in people being treated for the first time, according to findings from the ONCEMRK study presented in a late-breaker session at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Young Women Treated Very Early Stay HIV Negative and Preserve Immune Function

A group of youngSouth African women who were diagnosed during very HIV early infection and immediately given antiretroviral therapy (ART) preserved their CD4 cell counts and the function of cells that HIV normally disrupts, according to a study presented at the 2016 Towards an HIV Cure Symposium, which preceded the 21st International AIDS Conference this week in Durban, South Africa. The majority of them never seroconverted, staying HIV-negative despite having evidence of low levels of HIV infection in their cells.

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AIDS 2016: Dolutegravir Plus Lamivudine Works Well as First-Line HIV Treatment

A 2-drug regimen of dolutegravir and the well-tolerated NRTI lamivudine led to sustained viral suppression for most people starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the first time in a small pilot study, according to a late-breaker presentation at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Gains in Curbing HIV Could Be Lost Without Continued Commitment

Participants at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016), taking place this week in Durban, South Africa, reviewed the remarkable gains that have been made in access to HIV treatment and new prevention tools since the conference was last held here 16 years ago. But researchers, activists, and government leaders agreed that this progress could be reversed if stakeholders do not commit to increased funding and respect for the human rights of key populations at risk.

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