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HIV Drug Therapy: Australia Performs Best in HIV Treatment Cascade -- 62% Undetectable Viral Load

Australia and northern European countries are doing far better than North America at retaining people living with HIV in care and achieving viral suppression, according to a comprehensive survey of treatment cascades in high-income countries presented this week at the International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection in Glasgow.

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HIV Drug Therapy: Do Emtricitabine and Lamivudine Have Similar Efficacy for First-line ART?

First-line antiretroviral regimens containing emtricitabine have superior virological efficacy to combinations containing lamivudine when combined with tenofovir and either nevirapine or efavirenz, Dutch investigators report in the October 1 online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases and at the HIV Drug Therapy Glasgow conference taking place this week. Lamivudine was associated a significantly increased risk of virological failure when used in these regimens.

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HIV and Hepatitis C Highlights from AIDS 2014

Latest Positive Pulse Newsletter

Paul Sax from Harvard Medical School and Mark Sulkowski from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine discuss highlights from this summer's International AIDS Conference, the largest and most comprehensive global meeting on the medical, public health, and social aspects of HIV and AIDS.

Highlights of this overview include the HIV cascade of care, developments in antiretroviral therapy, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and other HIV prevention news, and new hepatitis C treatment for people with HIV/HCV coinfection.

10/22/14

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HIV Drug Therapy: Efavirenz Compromises Hormonal Contraceptive Implant

The widely prescribed non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) efavirenz substantially reduces levels of the hormonal contraceptive levonorgestrel, a component of a progesterone contraceptive implant widely used in developing countries, according to findings from a study conducted in Uganda presented this week at the HIV Drug Therapy Glasgow conference.

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IDWeek 2014: Earlier Treatment, NNRTI Use Predict Slower HIV Rebound After Stopping ART

HIV viral load usually begins to rise again within 4 to 8 weeks after stopping antiretroviral therapy (ART), though starting treatment earlier in the course of infection and using a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) may delay viral rebound, according to study findings presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia.

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HIV R4P: Injectable Rilpivirine Shows Promise, May Work Better for Anal than Vaginal Sex

A Phase 1 dose-finding and safety study in humans of TMC278-LA, a long-acting, injectable formation of the antiretroviral drug rilpivirine, found that a single 1200 mg dose could produce sustained drug levels in rectal tissues that could offer protection against HIV for 3 months, and did in fact suppress viral replication in so-called explants (biopsies of rectal mucosal cells) for that length of time. However -- and to the surprise of researchers presenting this study at the HIV Research for Prevention conference last week in Cape Town -- drug levels in vaginal and cervical cells were only about half of those seen in rectal cells, and viral replication was not suppressed in vaginal and cervical biopsies taken from women given TMC278-LA.

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IDWeek 2014: NNRTIs and Protease Inhibitors Both Good for First ART, Channeling Affects Choices

Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and boosted protease inhibitors work equally well for people starting HIV treatment for the first time, with similar viral suppression, CD4 cell gains, and disease progression, according to a large meta-analysis presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia. A related study shed light on factors affecting choice of initial antiretroviral regimen.

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