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HIVR4P 2016: More Viral Suppression Needed to Reduce HIV Infections Among Gay Men

HIV suppression on antiretroviral therapy (ART) would need to increase substantially among men who have sex with men in order to take advantage of "treatment as prevention" to reduce the rate of new HIV infections, according to a mathematical modeling study presented at the HIV Research for Prevention conference (HIVR4P 2016) taking place this week in Chicago.

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Researchers Observe Sustained Remission in Monkeys with HIV-Like Virus

Researchers have induced sustained remission of simian immune deficiency virus (SIV), a relative of HIV, in macaque monkeys treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) and an antibody-based therapy used to treat inflammatory bowel disease, according to a report in the October 14 edition of Science. The monkeys not only had undetectable viral load for up to nearly 2 years after stopping treatment, but they also showed replenishment of key immune cells in the gut.

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Sweden Becomes First Country to Achieve UNAIDS 90-90-90 Targets

Sweden has become the first country to achieve the UNAIDS/World Health Organization (WHO) 90-90-90 targets, research published in the August 18 advance edition of HIV Medicine shows. At the end of 2015, 90% of HIV cases in Sweden were diagnosed, 99.8% of people were linked to care, and 95% of people taking antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months had a viral load below 50 copies/mL.

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Resources for People with HIV and Hepatitis in Disaster Areas

During and after disasters such as Hurricane Matthew, people with medical conditions including HIV and viral hepatitis will be among those displaced and requiring emergency care. Government agencies offer resources for people with these and other chronic conditions, healthcare providers, and others who provide emergency and disaster-related services.

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USCA 2016: U.S. Conference on AIDS Discusses HIV Prevention and Access to Care

The U.S. Conference on AIDS (USCA 201c), sponsored by the National Minority AIDS Council,is taking place this week, September 15-18, in Hollywood, Florida. The largest U.S. conference focused on the community-based response to HIV/AIDS, USCA brings together researchers, front-line providers, community organizations, government policymakers, and people living with HIV and their advocates to discuss how to improve access to HIV prevention, care, and treatment.

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Media Reports of a British HIV Cure Breakthrough Are Premature

The Sunday Times yesterday reported that HIV had become undetectable in the blood of one man taking part in the RIVER study, a trial of an intensive treatment regimen designed to test whether it is possible to reduce levels of HIV-infected cells in the bodies of people recently infected with HIV. The Sunday Times reported that British scientists are on the "brink of an HIV cure." But in fact, the study is still in its early stages, participants are still on antiretroviral treatment, and it will not be able to describe participants as "cured" until extensive follow-up has taken place.

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AIDS 2016: Realism Needed About the Benefits and Risks of Taking Part in HIV Cure Research

A significant proportion of people living with HIV would be willing to take part in a study towards a cure for HIV, according to research presented at the recent 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) in Durban. However, some potential participants may not fully understand that taking part in an early-phase study is highly unlikely to afford any personal clinical benefit, but might have the potential to cause harm.

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