Back HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Topics HIV Treatment

EACS 2015: Can Dolutegravir Dual Therapy or Monotherapy Keep HIV Suppressed?

The potent integrase inhibitor dolutegravir taken with a single well-tolerated NRTI was able to fully suppress viral load in people initiating antiretroviral treatment for the first time, while dolutegravir alone was able to keep HIV suppressed in most treatment-experienced people who started with undetectable viral load, according to a set of studies presented at the 15th European AIDS Conference this week in Barcelona. After these presentations experts offered evidence in favor of and opposed to simplifying treatment by reducing drug burden, disagreeing about whether this strategy is beneficial or too risky.

alt

Read more:

EACS 2015: Benefits of Early HIV Treatment Are Clear, But Issues Raised by START and D:A:D Still Unresolved

The long-running controversy over when to start antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been definitively answered, but research is still needed to fully understand the implications of the large START and D:A:D studies, Professor Jens Lundgren from the University of Copenhagen said at a joint plenary session of the 15th European AIDS Conference and the 17th International Workshop on Co-morbidities and Adverse Drug Reactions in HIV.

alt

Read more:

IDWeek 2015: Studies Continue to Support Tenofovir Alafenamide as it Nears Approval

A single-tablet regimen containing a new formulation of tenofovir maintained viral suppression when switching from other combinations and was associated with improved kidney function and bone health, according to studies presented at IDWeek 2105 last week in San Diego. Other research showed that the new formulation works better than the old one for black patients and for older people, and that it can be safely used with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni) for hepatitis C treatment.

alt

Read more:

IDWeek 2015: Post-Treatment Control of HIV Appears Rare, Biomarkers May Help Predict Rebound

Only 4 individuals out of nearly 5000 people receiving care at U.S. military health facilities were found to exhibit immune control of HIV after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART), achieving viral suppression, and interrupting treatment, according to a presentation at IDWeek 2015 this month in San Diego. A recently published related study identified several biomarkers that may help predict who will be post-treatment controllers, a useful tool for HIV cure research.

alt

Read more:

IDWeek 2015: HIV Attachment Inhibitor BMS-663068 Matches Atazanavir in Phase 2b Study

Bristol-Myers Squibb's HIV attachment inhibitor BMS-663068 (fostemsavir), which prevents the virus from binding to T-cells, demonstrated good antiviral activity and was well-tolerated at 24 weeks, according to study results published recently in Lancet HIV. Findings from a subgroup analysis at 48 weeks, presented at IDWeek 2015 this week in San Diego, showed that response rates were similar regardless of demographics or baseline viral load or CD4 cell count.

alt

Read more:

IDWeek 2015: Many People with HIV Are Not Virally Suppressed on Antiretroviral Therapy

A third of people with HIV on antiretroviral therapy (ART) do not have sustained viral suppression and many are not receiving regimens recommended by the latest U.S. treatment guidelines, according to data from the Medical Monitoring Project presented at IDWeek 2015 last week in San Diego. However, this study included many people with long-term HIV infection who may not have been able to use preferred first-line regimens.

alt

Read more:

ICAAC 2015: No Transmission of Integrase Inhibitor-Resistant HIV Seen in California Patients

Not one case of transmission of HIV that is resistant to any of the integrase inhibitor drugs has been seen among newly diagnosed patients in a database of resistance tests in California, according to a presentation at the 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)last month in San Diego.

alt

Read more: