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CROI 2014: The Role of Interferon in HIV Response [VIDEO]

Although interferon is on its way out as a standard of care for hepatitis C, researchers are learning more about its role in HIV, conference vice chair Julie Overbaugh said at a media briefing on the opening day of the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this week in Boston.

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CROI 2014: Retrovirus Conference Starts Monday in Boston

The 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) will take place next week, March 3-6, at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. HIVandHepatitis.com will be on site all week to bring you the latest news coverage about HIV, hepatitis C, and related topics.

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HIV Infection Linked to Structural Heart Disease

People with HIV who have detectable viral load are more likely to have structural heart problems such as left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, or pulmonary hypertension, according to research presented at the recent EuroEcho-Imaging 2013 conference in Istanbul.

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Adolescents Born with HIV May Have Higher Heart Disease Risk

Nearly half of adolescents with lifelong HIV infection were found to have evidence of coronary artery atherosclerosis, putting them at elevated risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the December 23, 2013, advance edition of Circulation.

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HIV Medicine Association Guidelines Emphasize Primary Care Needs of People with HIV on ART

The HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) this week released new Primary Care Guidelines for the Management of Persons Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, focusing on primary care and prevention for HIV positive people on effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). The new guidelines, published in the November 13, 2013, online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases (in print January 2014) "reflect the fact that people with HIV are now living normal life spans," according to an HIVMA/IDSA press release.

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Cancer Is a Growing Concern Among People with HIV

People with HIV continue to experience higher rates of both AIDS-defining and non-AIDS cancers in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to a report in the February 20, 2014, issue of AIDS. Increased longevity alone does not explain the rise in non-AIDS cancer rates, and further research is needed on the causes and best treatments for cancer in this population, the study authors concluded.

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Updated Pediatric HIV Opportunistic Infection Guidelines Emphasize Antiretroviral Therapy

The U.S. National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other medical associations have released an updated version of Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Exposed and HIV-Infected Children. The latest revision emphasizes the importance of timely antiretroviral therapy as a key to preventing and managing OIs in infants and children with HIV.

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Low CD4 Count Raises Risk of Heart Attack, Bone Loss

HIV positive people whose CD4 T-cell count falls below 200 cells/mm3 are at greater risk for myocardial infarction, though the heart attack rate is not elevated for people with counts of 500 cells/mm3 or more, researchers recently reported. Another study found that people with low CD4 counts have a higher likelihood of bone loss after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART).

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EACS 2013: Suicide Rates and Psychiatric Drug Use Among People with HIV

A study presented at the recent 14th European AIDS Conference found that the suicide rate among people with HIV in British Columbia had fallen 35-fold since 1996 and was now close to that of the general population. However, a second study from Denmark found rates of psychiatric drug use, especially sleeping pills and tranquilizers, to be 2-3 times higher among people with HIV than in the general population, and saw a marked rise in the use of antipsychotic drugs 7 or 8 years after diagnosis.

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