Back HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Topics HIV-Related Conditions

Rilpivirine Is Associated with Less Blood Fat Elevation than Efavirenz

People with HIV who started first-line treatment with a regimen containing rilpivirine (Edurant, also in the Complera coformulation) had smaller blood lipid increases and were less likely to have abnormal levels than those who started on efavirenz (Sustiva, also in the Atripla coformulation), according to 2-year data from the ECHO and THRIVE trials published in the April 11 online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

alt

Read more:

People with HIV Have Higher Bone Fracture Risk in Danish Study

Being HIV positive was associated with a nearly 3-fold greater likelihood of bone fractures overall -- and a 9-fold higher risk of hip and spine fractures -- compared with HIV negative people, according to results from a large Danish population study described in the May 1 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2014: Neurocognitive Problems, Depression, and Early ART in People with HIV

In a particularly challenging area of HIV care where research is complicated by gaps in knowledge and invasive clinical procedures, there was significant attention to neurological manifestations -- or neuroAIDS -- at this year’s Conference on Antiretroviral Agents and Chemotherapy (CROI 2014) last month in Boston.

alt

Read more:

People with HIV Have Higher Risk of Melanoma Skin Cancer

People with HIV -- especially those with light skin -- continue to have a significantly increased risk of developing melanoma in the era of highly effective antiretroviral therapy, and should protect themselves from the sun, according to a meta-analysis published in the April 16 edition of the open-access journal PLoS ONE.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2014: Researchers Discuss HIV, Aging, and Frailty

People living with HIV are at greater risk of geriatric syndromes such as frailty and difficulty with daily activities than HIV negative people of the same age -- and this can have a significant effect upon their quality of life as they age, according to several studies presented at the 14th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last month in Boston.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2014: Chronic Lung Disease Is Prevalent and Under-diagnosed in People with HIV

Even though the incidence of most HIV-related respiratory complications and opportunistic infections have declined dramatically since the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), 4 studies presented at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last month in Boston showed that people living with HIV are still at increased risk of serious progressive lung complications, including under-diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema.

alt

Read more:

Men with HIV Have Higher Risk of Heart Disease

HIV positive men have more extensive atherosclerosis, or build-up of plaque in their arteries, than HIV negative men after taking into account other cardiovascular risk factors, potentially raising the risk of heart attack, according to an analysis from the large MACS cohort published in the April 1 Annals of Internal Medicine.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2014: Vitamin D and Rosuvastatin Improve Bone Loss in People with HIV

A combination of high-dose vitamin D and calcium may help reduce bone loss after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to a presentation at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last month in Boston. A related study found that rosuvastatin increased hip bone mineral density in HIV positive people on ART, though insulin resistance worsened.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2014: Heart Attack Link to Abacavir Persists in D:A:D Study

The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor abacavir (Ziagen, also in Epzicom or Kivexa) continues to be associated with a near-doubling of the risk of heart attack, according to the latest update from the Data Collection on Adverse events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study, presented to the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) this month in Boston.

alt

Read more: