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CROI 2015: Study Finds High Rates of Cancer Among Elderly People with HIV

Elderly people living with HIV (over the age of 65) are at greatly increased risk of HIV-associated cancers, though many of the most commonly diagnosed cancers may be related more to aging than to HIV itself, according to a study reported last week at the at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI).

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Coverage of the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections (CROI 2015), February 23-26, 2015, in Seattle.

Conference highlights include PrEP and HIV treatment as prevention, hepatitis C treatment for HIV/HCV coinfected people, new antiretroviral drugs, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions, TB, Ebola virus, and access to care.

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage by topic

CROI website

3/2/15

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HIV May Cause Cognitive Impairment by Disrupting Brain's Garbage Disposal

HIV's Tat protein interferes with autophagy, a process by which damaged or unneeded cell components are broken down and eliminated, according to research published in the February 4 Journal of Neuroscience. This disruption can lead to neuron damage, but the immunosuppressant drug rapamycin was able to reverse this process in a study of mice.

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CROI 2015: Retrovirus Conference Now Underway in Seattle

The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) takes place this week, February 23-26, at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. CROI focuses on HIV treatment, prevention, and basic science. For the past several years it has also included substantial hepatitis C content, and this year will feature presentations on Ebola virus. HIVandHepatitis.com is on site in Seattle all week bringing you news coverage and Twitter updates (@HIVandHepatitis).

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HIV Rebound Linked to Liver Fibrosis Progression in HIV/HCV Coinfected

HIV-positive people with hepatitis C virus (HCV) experienced progression to liver fibrosis if their HIV viral load rebounded above 1000 copies/mL or remained detectable on 2 consecutive tests, researchers reported in the January edition of HIV Medicine. Smaller transient HIV "blips," however, were not associated with worsening fibrosis. Optimized antiretroviral therapy, the study authors suggested, may protect the liver.

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CROI 2015: Retrovirus Conference Starts Monday in Seattle

The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) takes place next week, February 23-26, at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. CROI focuses on HIV treatment, prevention, and basic science. For the past several years it has also included substantial hepatitis C content, and this year will feature presentations on Ebola virus. HIVandHepatitis.com will be on site in Seattle all week bringing you news coverage and Twitter updates (@HIVandHepatitis).

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Kaiser Study Shows No Elevated Heart Attack Risk for People with HIV

A previously reported increase in the risk of myocardial infarction or heart attack among people living with HIV has been reversed in recent years, according to an analysis of nearly 25,000 Kaiser Permanent members published in the January 18 edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. In 2010-2011, HIV positive patients were at no greater risk than HIV negative people.

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Screening for Bone Fracture Risk Should Be Routine for HIV+ People over 40

Screening for fracture risk should be a routine part of HIV care for all people over 40, and all postmenopausal women, all men over 50, and people at high risk for fractures of any age should undergo DEXA screening (a type of X-ray) to assess bone mineral density and their need for treatment, experts on bone disorders recommend in new guidelines published in the January 21 online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Low CD4 Count, Suboptimal HIV Treatment Linked to Higher Anal Cancer Risk

People with HIV who experienced extensive immune deficiency or who used early antiretroviral drugs before the advent of combination highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the mid-90s may be at greater risk for developing anal cancer, according to a retrospective analysis published in the January 28 edition of AIDS.

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