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CROI 2013: HIV and Aging -- Are People with HIV at Greater Risk for Heart Disease and Cancer? [VIDEO]

Keri Althoff from the VA Medical Center and George Washington University Medical School described findings from a study looking at risk of non-AIDS conditions such as cardiovascular disease and cancer at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) this month in Atlanta.

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CROI 2013: HIV+ Men at Increased Risk for Co-morbid Conditions Regardless of Age

 Men with HIV in a large cohort of U.S. veterans were more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, end-stage kidney disease, and certain cancers compared with HIV negative people, but not at earlier ages, according to a report presented at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this month in Atlanta.

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Coverage of the 2013 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013), March 3-6, 2013, in Atlanta.

Conference highlights include HIV experimental therapies and treatment strategies, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions and complications, treatment as prevention and PrEP, new treatments for hepatitis C, and HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfection.

Full listing by topic

HIVandHepatitis.com CROI 2013 conference section

3/4/13

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CROI 2013: Heart Disease Rises Only Slighter Faster with Age for People with HIV

The risk of cardiovascular disease among HIV positive men in D:A:D rose from age 40-45 to 60-65, but only slightly more rapidly than in the general population,researchers reported at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) last week in Atlanta. A related analysis found that the likelihood of death after a heart attack has fallen over time.

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CROI 2013: Retrovirus Conference Starts Sunday in Atlanta

The 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) kicks off Sunday, March 3, at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta. HIVandHepatitis.com will be on site next week to bring you breaking news coverage on HIV and hepatitis C.

Look for reports from the HIVandHepatitis.com team and our content partners at NAM/Aidsmap.com starting Monday. Sign up for our email newsletter to get the latest headlines and follow us on Twitter @HIVandHepatitis.alt

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CROI 2013: HIV+ People Less Likely to Use Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks, and May Benefit Less [VIDEO]

People with HIV were less likely than HIV negative people to use daily aspirin to prevent heart attacks, but among those who did, aspirin did not appear to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), researchers reported last week at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) in Atlanta.

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HIV Infection May Raise Risk of Sudden Hearing Loss

Young HIV positive people age 18 to 35 had more than twice the likelihood of sudden sensorineural hearing loss compared with their HIV negative counterparts, according to an analysis of nearly 9000 people with HIV described in the February 21, 2013, advance online edition of JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

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CROI 2013: Cancer Incidence After Starting Antiretroviral Therapy [VIDEO]

Rates of AIDS-related cancers start to fall not long after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), but non-AIDS cancers rise with increasing time on therapy, according to study findings presented last week at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) in Atlanta.

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People with HIV Have Higher Rates of Non-AIDS Malignancies, Skin Cancer

The incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers has increased among people with HIV in the era of effective antiretroviral treatment, including malignancies caused by viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV), and squamous cell non-melanoma skin cancer, according to 2 recently published studies.alt

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