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Coverage of the 2013 International AIDS Society Conference

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 7th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013), June 30-July 3, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Conference highlights include antiretroviral therapy strategies, treatment access, investigational agents for HIV and hepatitis C, management of HIV-related complications, biomedical HIV prevention, and HIV cure research.

Full listing by topic

HIVandHepatitis.com IAS 2013 conference section

7/6/13

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Bone Loss and Fracture Risk are 'Modest' among HIV+ People, Linked to Tenofovir, Smoking, and HCV

Continued bone loss among HIV positive men with osteopenia was modest overall, but about 25% of those taking tenofovir (Viread, also in 4 antiretroviral coformulations) experienced significant loss, according to a recent study. A related meta-analysis found that HIV infection is associated with a modest likelihood of new fractures, with smoking and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection further increasing the risk.

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CROI 2013: HIV and Aging -- Are People with HIV at Greater Risk for Heart Disease and Cancer? [VIDEO]

Keri Althoff from the VA Medical Center and George Washington University Medical School described findings from a study looking at risk of non-AIDS conditions such as cardiovascular disease and cancer at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) this month in Atlanta.

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CROI 2013: Random Anal Biopsies Improve Detection of Pre-cancerous Lesions

Performing random anal biopsies increases the rate of diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) during high-resolution anoscopy, researchers from Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York City reported at the recent 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013).alt

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CROI 2013: HIV+ Men at Increased Risk for Co-morbid Conditions Regardless of Age

 Men with HIV in a large cohort of U.S. veterans were more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, end-stage kidney disease, and certain cancers compared with HIV negative people, but not at earlier ages, according to a report presented at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this month in Atlanta.

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CROI 2013: Researchers Look at Neurological Complications among People with HIV

Data from a small, yet well-designed trial to evaluate whether particular antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens penetrate the central nervous system (CNS) and enhance neurocognitive performance were among several interesting findings regarding neurological complications among people with HIV presented at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) this month in Atlanta. Another study looked at similarities between Alzheimer's disease and neurocognitive impairment in people with HIV.

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CROI 2013: Heart Disease Rises Only Slighter Faster with Age for People with HIV

The risk of cardiovascular disease among HIV positive men in D:A:D rose from age 40-45 to 60-65, but only slightly more rapidly than in the general population,researchers reported at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) last week in Atlanta. A related analysis found that the likelihood of death after a heart attack has fallen over time.

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CROI 2013: Statins for People with HIV -- How Sweet Is It?

Statins may help reduce co-morbid conditions such as cardiovascular disease and lower mortality for some people with HIV, but with a possible trade-off of higher diabetes risk, according to a series of studies presented and discussed at 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) this month in Atlanta.

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CROI 2013: HIV+ People Less Likely to Use Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks, and May Benefit Less [VIDEO]

People with HIV were less likely than HIV negative people to use daily aspirin to prevent heart attacks, but among those who did, aspirin did not appear to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), researchers reported last week at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) in Atlanta.

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