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IAS 2015: Altered Cholesterol Metabolism May Protect Immune Cells of Non-Progressors

Enhanced cholesterol metabolism in certain immune cells may help explain why some people with HIV can naturally control the virus with little or no disease progression, according to research presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention and at the preceding IAS Towards an HIV Cure Symposium last month in Vancouver. The findings suggest that regulating cellular cholesterol metabolism may offer a new approach to controlling HIV and potentially achieving a functional cure, or long-term remission.

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IAS 2015: Indiana HIV Outbreak -- Lessons about Containing Local Outbreaks and Harm Reduction

An early 2015 outbreak of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in rural Indiana linked to injection of prescription opiates offers a good example to how to track and contain a localized outbreak, according to a pair of presentations at a late-breaking prevention research session at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver. Attendees at the session stressed that we already know how to prevent such outbreaks, and called for implementation of needle exchange programs and other proven-effective harm reduction measures.

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IAS 2015: Pros and Cons of PrEP -- Volunteers Recount their Experiences in ADAPT Study

The reasons people come forward for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) or take it once prescribed are likely to be very mixed, and dependent as much on local political and cultural beliefs as they are on more personal factors like relationship status, researchers reported at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: START Supports ART For All [VIDEO]

Full results from the Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment (START) trial provide definitive evidence that starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after HIV diagnosis, rather than waiting until the CD4 T-cell count falls below 500 cells/mm3, significantly reduces the risk of AIDS-related and non-AIDS illness and death, researchers reported at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: Intensification of ART Reduces Risk of Late-term Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission

Maternal and infant antiretroviral therapy (ART) intensification is very effective in preventing HIV transmission during labor and birth from pregnant women with HIV in Thailand who present late for care, with less than 8 weeks of standard ART, Marc Lallemant reported at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: WAVES Shows Elvitegravir Regimen Beats Boosted Atazanavir for Women with HIV

A study of antiretroviral treatment specifically for women with HIV showed that a single-tablet regimen containing the integrase inhibitor elvitegravir suppressed the virus better than a regimen containing ritonavir-boosted atazanavir, according to a poster presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver. This study is important in part because it demonstrates that including more women in clinical trials is feasible.

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IAS 2015: Young Gay Men at Lower Risk for HIV than Previous Generations, but Racial Disparities Persist

An innovative analysis of HIV trends in the Seattle area has found that gay men who were born in the early 1960s had the highest lifetime risk of acquiring HIV, but that this risk has declined dramatically in subsequent generations. But while black gay men born in the 1970s and 1980s have a much lower risk of acquiring HIV than their forebears, racial disparities remain stark, according to a report at the 8thInternational AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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